Search Cars

Sunday, April 17, 2016

2016 BMW X1 - Review





PRICE : 2016 BMW X1 $34,800



If you're shopping for an entry-level BMW crossover SUV, you're going to end up looking at the X1, the automaker's smallest and most affordable utility vehicle. The previous-generation BMW X1 was great fun to drive but exceptionally tight on passenger space, and therefore pretty impractical for family use. It's a different story with the redesigned 2016 BMW X1, though, which is taller and wider and much roomier on the inside. That's not the only upgrade on the new X1, but it's the main reason to put this small luxury crossover back on your shopping list.

BMW purists might alert you to the fact that the X1 is no longer based on the rear-wheel-drive 3 Series and now shares its front-wheel-drive platform architecture with the Mini Cooper family (BMW owns Mini). We'll agree that it's a little weird to have "front-wheel drive" and "BMW" in the same sentence, but for the majority of shoppers interested in an entry-level luxury crossover, there's no significant downside to this change. Minis are already known for their nimble handling, so there's hardly any great loss in raiding the corporate parts bin, while the standard turbocharged four-cylinder engine, while down on power compared to last year's four-cylinder X1, should deliver acceleration and fuel mileage that's as good as or better than any of this crossover's four-cylinder rivals. Plus, all-wheel drive is also standard, so every 2016 X1 is suitable for winter-weather driving.

Inside the 2016 BMW X1, head-, shoulder and legroom have all increased, especially in the backseat. Cargo capacity is now near the top of the class, though anyone needing serious cubic footage would do better with a larger crossover like the X3. Cabin materials are noticeably nicer than before, and the X1's front occupants finally get standard power-adjustable seats. There are a few new technology features, too, including an available head-up display, a hands-free power liftgate and a frontal collision mitigation system with pedestrian detection.

Within the growing class of small luxury crossover SUVs, the BMW X1 is easily one of the most appealing options for 2016. You'll find interior accommodations of similar quality in competitors like the Audi Q3 and Mercedes-Benz GLA250, but adults will have trouble getting comfortable in their snug backseats, and both crossovers are quite a bit slower than the X1. The distinctively styled Lexus NX 200t has a nicely appointed cabin of its own and a good-sized rear seat, but offers very little cargo space when that seat's in use. Meanwhile, the larger and somewhat more expensive Acura RDX is better suited for families than the others and remains an excellent value for shoppers who prefer a six-cylinder engine.

That's not to say the 2016 BMW X1 wouldn't also work for a small family. Whereas its predecessor was narrowly focused on delivering a sporty driving experience, this new X1 is far more practical and worth considering if you want a useful luxury crossover with a small footprint.


EXTERIOR








As expected, the second-gen X1 sports an evolutionary design with styling cues borrowed from its bigger siblings, the X3 and X5. The front fascia features a slightly bigger twin-kidney grille and longer, sleeker headlamps. Down below, the X1 received larger fog lamps and larger air intakes, making it seem not only bigger than its predecessor, but more aggressive as well. In all, it seems as if the X1 is no longer the ugly duckling of the BMW crossover family.

When viewed from the side, the X1 seems nearly identical to its predecessor from the waist down. The trademark beltline is still in place, while the side skirt area is creased in a similar fashion as on the previous model. However, things are different from the waist up, with a taller glass area, a bigger quarter window, and a raked roofline.

The rear fascia has received its fair share of upgrades as well, starting with significantly larger taillights, which look way better than the previous units, and a better sculpted tailgate and upper bumper area.

Overall, it seems the X1 has become a baby X5, and there’s nothing wrong with that. Mini SUVs aren’t exactly appealing design-wise, but BMW tried really hard with the X1 and the result is quite good.


INTERIOR












Whereas earlier BMW X1s had a fairly plain interior design, the 2016 X1 is more inviting and has one of the most elegant cabins in this price range. The expensive-looking dash combines BMW's classic analog gauges with modern technology and high-quality materials, although, you'll need to ante up for the optional 8.8-inch iDrive display screen to enjoy the full effect. The biggest upgrade compared to last year's X1, though, is the increase in passenger space.

BMW purists might alert you to the fact that the X1 is no longer based on the rear-wheel-drive 3 Series and now shares its front-wheel-drive platform architecture with the Mini Cooper family (BMW owns Mini). We'll agree that it's a little weird to have "front-wheel drive" and "BMW" in the same sentence, but for the majority of shoppers interested in an entry-level luxury crossover, there's no significant downside to this change. Minis are already known for their nimble handling, so there's hardly any great loss in raiding the corporate parts bin, while the standard turbocharged four-cylinder engine, while down on power compared to last year's four-cylinder X1, should deliver acceleration and fuel mileage that's as good as or better than any of this crossover's four-cylinder rivals. Plus, all-wheel drive is also standard, so every 2016 X1 is suitable for winter-weather driving.

Inside the 2016 BMW X1, head-, shoulder and legroom have all increased, especially in the backseat. Cargo capacity is now near the top of the class, though anyone needing serious cubic footage would do better with a larger crossover like the X3. Cabin materials are noticeably nicer than before, and the X1's front occupants finally get standard power-adjustable seats. There are a few new technology features, too, including an available head-up display, a hands-free power liftgate and a frontal collision mitigation system with pedestrian detection.

Within the growing class of small luxury crossover SUVs, the BMW X1 is easily one of the most appealing options for 2016. You'll find interior accommodations of similar quality in competitors like the Audi Q3 and Mercedes-Benz GLA250, but adults will have trouble getting comfortable in their snug backseats, and both crossovers are quite a bit slower than the X1. The distinctively styled Lexus NX 200t has a nicely appointed cabin of its own and a good-sized rear seat, but offers very little cargo space when that seat's in use. Meanwhile, the larger and somewhat more expensive Acura RDX is better suited for families than the others and remains an excellent value for shoppers who prefer a six-cylinder engine.

That's not to say the 2016 BMW X1 wouldn't also work for a small family. Whereas its predecessor was narrowly focused on delivering a sporty driving experience, this new X1 is far more practical and worth considering if you want a useful luxury crossover with a small footprint.


SPECIFICATION


► Year:2016
► Make:BMW
► Model:X1
► Price:$ 32000 (Est.)
► Engine:inline-4
► Horsepower @ RPM:228 @ 5000
► Torque @ RPM:258 @ 1250
► Displacement:2.0 L
► 0-60 time:6.3 sec.
► Top Speed:130 mph


FEATURES


With a starting price in the mid-$30,000s, the 2016 BMW X1 isn't lavishly equipped in base form. At launch there's just one trim level—xDrive 28i—that comes with an 8-speed automatic transmission and all-wheel drive. Standard features include power front seats with driver-side memory, a seven-speaker sound system, a multi-function steering wheel, and leather-like SensaTec (synthetic) upholstery.

Most X1s will probably arrive at dealerships with one or more option groups. The Luxury package adds leather seats and wood or aluminum trim; the Premium package builds on that with features like a panoramic roof, keyless entry, and LED headlights. Heated seats are part of the Cold Weather package, and the Technology package has highlights like navigation and a head-up display. There are also a pair of Driver Assistance packages. An M Sport package with sport seats and exclusive transmission/suspension tuning will become available later in the year.

Stand-alone options include a 12-speaker Harman Kardon sound system, and many features from packages are available à la carte. Perhaps the easiest call to make is the sliding/reclining rear seat that enhances the X1's versatility for just a few hundred dollars.


PERFORMANCE


The 2016 BMW X1 comes with just one drivetrain: an all-new turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-4 rated for 228 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque. It's mated to an 8-speed automatic transmission with comfort, sport, and eco modes, and paddle shifters. BMW claims 0-to-60 mph acceleration of 6.3 seconds, and that feels about right to us.

The fact that the X1 barely qualifies as a crossover works in the favor of its on-road performance. Simply put, it's fun to drive. Electric speed-sensitive steering is quick and communicative, braking is good, and you can hustle the X1 through corners at un-crossover-like speeds. We found that the transmission stubbornly resists downshifting during uphill acceleration from low speeds with moderate throttle, but flipping into sport mode solves that problem.

A test drive along mountain roads beset by detritus from a series of landslides gave the X1 a chance to demonstrate its SUV-lite capabilities. Good ground clearance proved especially useful in this approximation of real-world obstacles an X1 owner might actually encounter. We did lose traction, though, in a few gravel-strewn apexes taken at speeds that seemed reasonable, and this somewhat diminished our confidence.

The X1 rides on standard 18-inch wheels with run-flat all-season tires. Conventional all-season tires with a space-saver spare are a no-cost option; 19-inch wheels with run-flat performance tires cost extra.


ENGINE


The 2016 BMW X1 is powered by a new, 2.0-liter turbocharged 4-cylinder that makes 228 horsepower. Astute observers may note that power is actually down from the 240 figure made by the former 2.0-liter engine. BMW promises that its performance is the same, though, with the ability to hit the 0-60-mph benchmark in 6.3 seconds. A Sport mode livens throttle response and stiffens steering feel, while comfort and eco modes tone down settings. All X1 models are all-wheel drive and use an 8-speed Aisin automatic transmission. The new X1's fuel-economy ratings remain the same as those of the outgoing model. A start-stop system shuts off the engine at idle to safe fuel. If you find the restarts jarring, it can be defeated. Premium gasoline is recommended. 

► 2.0-liter turbocharged inline-4 
228 horsepower @ 5,000 rpm 
258 lb-ft of torque @ 1,250 rpm 
EPA city/highway fuel economy: 22/32 mpg


FUEL ECONOMY


BMW eliminated its six-cylinder from the X1 lineup, at least for the time being. That leaves a turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine that returns a respectable 22 mpg city, 32 highway, 26 combined, according to the EPA.

It achieves greener performance in a variety of ways. A new 8-speed automatic transmission, for instance, minimizes energy loss with reduced converter slip, while a wider gear spread cuts emissions by lowering revs at higher speeds. The all-wheel-drive system has also been engineered to reduce weight and energy loss. And the Eco Pro mode enables a coasting function that disengages the powertrain when the driver lifts off the accelerator at speeds between 30 mph and 100 mph


SAFETY


Every 2016 BMW X1 comes standard with stability and traction control, antilock disc brakes (with automatic brake drying), front side airbags, full-length side curtain airbags, front knee airbags, active front-seat head restraints and hill descent control. Also standard is the BMW Assist emergency communications system, which provides automatic crash notification, stolen vehicle recovery and on-demand roadside assistance.

Optional safety equipment includes the rearview camera and parking sensors that are part of the basic Driver Assistance package. The Plus version of that package provides more advanced driver aids like a frontal collision warning and mitigation system with pedestrian detection and lane departure warnings.


VIDEO




By : Automotive News & Super Modified Sports Cars

Posted by : Shahen Tharammal





No comments:

Post a Comment