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Monday, March 24, 2014

2014 Chevrolet Impala








PRICE : For 2014 Chevrolet Impala $26,860


The 2014 Chevrolet Impala ranks 1 out of 10 Affordable Large Cars. This ranking is based on our analysis of published reviews and test drives of the Chevrolet Impala, as well as reliability and safety data.

Critics agree that a high-quality interior, aggressive styling and a wealth of available features make the redesigned 2014 Chevrolet Impala an undeniably modern and comfortable large car. Because it has the best combination of positive reviews, price and long-term ownership costs in its class, we named the 2014 Chevrolet Impala the Best Large Car for the Money. It's also our 2014 Best Large Car for Families.

The 2014 Chevrolet Impala comes standard with a four-cylinder engine. Most reviewers have tested models that have the optional V6, which they say offers good power from a stop, as well as capable acceleration for highway passing and merging. A six-speed automatic transmission is standard on all models, and although one test driver is disappointed that paddle shifters aren’t available, most reviewers agree that it shifts quickly and smoothly. The EPA reports that the base Impala gets 21/31 mpg city/highway, which is a competitive estimate for a four-cylinder large car.

However, the Impala offers its best fuel economy estimates of 25/35 mpg when equipped with its optional eAssist powertrain, which combines a four-cylinder engine with a small electric motor. While no reviewer considers the Impala a sport sedan, test drivers agree that the Chevy Impala offers balanced handling and accurate steering, especially for its size. Strong brakes and a firm, but comfortable ride also impress critics who’ve driven the 2014 Impala.

While the 2013 model disappointed reviewers with a basic interior that was awash in hard plastics, test drivers report that the redesigned 2014 Impala has an eye-catching interior that’s built with premium materials. The Impala also shines with comfortable front seats, as well as plenty of back-seat passenger space and one of the largest trunks in the class. Some critics report that the Impala’s optional infotainment system doesn’t react as quickly to user inputs as they would like.

However, most reviewers agree that the Impala’s tech features are user-friendly, with large touch-screen icons and traditional knobs that control many audio and climate settings. The 2014 Chevrolet Impala comes standard with a six-speaker stereo with satellite and HD Radio, Bluetooth phone connectivity and audio streaming and a USB port. Available features include a sunroof, dual-zone automatic climate control, Chevrolet’s MyLink infotainment system, an 11-speaker Bose stereo system, keyless access with push-button start, adaptive cruise control, heated and ventilated front seats and a heated steering wheel. Available safety features include a backup camera, rear parking sensors, forward collision alert and blind spot monitoring and lane departure warning systems.



EXTERIOR















With the exception of being a full-size sedan, the Chevy bowtie, and the “Impala” badges, the 2014 Impala looks nothing like its 2012 counterpart. From the side profile, the front clip has a Camaro-like shape to it, yet it doesn’t necessarily resemble the Camaro. It more or less just has the sweeping front profile of the Camaro. The roofline of the 2014 Impala swoops upward from the low-sloped windshield and as it heads toward the trunk it swoops downward, making for a very modern look.

The headlights are 100% brand new – thanks for that Chevy. Gone are the teardrop-shaped headlights and replacing them are sleeker rectangular wraparound HID headlights that give this sedan a more refined finish. Also outgoing is the honeycomb or chicken wire grille, whichever you want to call it, and in comes a horizontal bar grille, giving the Impala a more classy look.

Also replaced are the outdated triangle-shaped taillights. Sleeker and more refined taillights, which are a tapered-rectangle design, take the place of the old taillights. Also on the back end are twin exhaust pipes that mold into a bumper, finishing off this sedan’s sleek appearance.

There are chrome accents around the front grilles and side windows, along with a chrome insert on the trunk. Combine this chrome with the standard 18-inch chrome wheels and suddenly this once average sedan has a luxurious look.



INTERIOR
















The Impala's cabin transformation is just as striking as its new exterior look. The dash and console design finally looks modern and sophisticated, although some of the plastic elements in the center console look decidedly down-market and are flimsy to the touch.

A longer wheelbase opens up more legroom all around, giving 6-foot (or taller) front and rear passengers plenty of room to stretch out in wide, comfortable seats covered in cloth, a cloth/suede combination, a vinyl/suede combination or leather. The vinyl/suede combo (optional on the LT) is our favorite, as it looks quite upscale thanks to contrasting piping on the edges of the seats. Unlike last year, there's no front bench seat option, so seating capacity tops out at five. There is, however, a 60/40-split-folding rear seatback standard that helps expand the trunk's already generous 18.8-cubic-foot hold. Expect less capacity in the eAssist model, which has a battery pack mounted under the cargo floor.

The Impala also leaps into the 21st century with the 8-inch MyLink touchscreen interface for audio, navigation and phone functions. MyLink comes standard in LT and LTZ models (with navigation optional). Though it can be a little slow to respond at times, MyLink does provide a straightforward control interface that you'll adjust to easily if you already have a smartphone. One other minor annoyance is the rearview camera display: It's better that not having a camera at all, but the resolution isn't very good for an image projected on an 8-inch screen.

The center stack also offers redundant audio and climate control dials if you don't want to bother with the touchscreen. One particularly nice feature is that the Impala's front passenger is able to pair a phone or program the nav system while the car is on the move if the occupant sensor detects that someone is in that seat.



SPECIFICATION


► Year: 2014
► Make: Chevrolet
► Model: Impala
► Price:  $26,860
► Type: 5-passenger, front-wheel-drive 4-door sedan
► Engine: V6
► Transmission: six-speed automatic transmission
► Horsepower @ RPM: 303
► MPG: 18 city/28 hwy
► Wheel base: 111.7 in.
► 18, 19, 20 inch. wheels
► Curb weight: TBD
► Displacement:3.6 L



FEATURES










► New Features :

► Redesigned for 2014
► Moves firmly into large car category
► Next-generation Chevrolet MyLink technology
► Improved safety equipments

In polite circles, the Impala would be called beefy. The Feds call it a full-size sedan. In truth, it's not a lot bigger than an Azera, a Passat, or an Avalon--but it packs a lot of room under its roofline, shaming the inefficient layout of the Ford Taurus, for one.

The Impala's overall length of 201.3 inches draws down to 111.7 inches between the wheels--compared to 106.3 inchess of wheelbase on, say, a three-row Kia Sorento crossover. It's 73 inches wide, too. Compared to the last Impala--now the fleet-only Limited--the 2014 version has about 3.5 inches more front-seat leg room and 2.2 inches more in the back seat.

Open the wide, tall doors, and the Impala V-6's nicely shaped seats aren't too deep a knee-bend away. At least five different seats are specified across the lineup, but that's mostly because of optional seat heating and ventilation--only the base versions are cloth. Leather-clad versions on the LTZ have a middle grade of hides covering them, better than the cloth/vinyl seats in look and just slightly, in feel, since lumbar adjustment comes with them standard. Head and leg room are more than enough for even 99th-percentile types; the Impala's one of the rare new cars where you can power the driver seat too low and too high.

The rear seats aren't quite as close to premium, but leg room is only an inch or two short of limousine status. The cushion lays almost flat, it's a bit short for the car's size--and even so, headroom isn't extraordinary. I made close contact with the headliner, and at six feet tall, I'm not the worst-case scenario for backseat use. Two adults will have enough space for a pre-teen between, though, and the seats can be fitted with bite-sized head rests shaped like old-school car bumpers. Score one for visibility.

Even with five passengers, filling the Impala's cargo bins will take some work. The trunk's 18.8 cubic feet, second only to the Taurus' 20-cubic-foot whopper. It's a little shallow, but the trunk floor is flat and extends deeply beneath the rear glass. The doors all have long bins with bottle holders; the center console can swallow a shoebox, a smartphone in either a rubberized tray or a bin hidden under a lid, and two drinks. If you're in an LT or an LTZ, there's a hidden chamber behind the MyLink LCD touchscreen, too--tap a button and the screen rises so you can stow goodies, then lock it out in a valet mode with a code you can enter and change.

Chevy has tuned the Impala's interior for quieter rolling ambience. Four-cylinder models will sport active noise cancellation, like Chevy's Equinox, and the plusher versions get thicker glass and more sound deadening. The impression of noise control is a good one.

It's in the area of fit and finish where the Impala can get a better sense of direction when it comes in for the inevitable mid-cycle refresh. The busy twin-cowl cockpit is covered, studded, paneled, and draped in so many different materials and textures, it's almost a parlor game to find and name them all. The seat-heater surround is a glitzy, flecked black plastic; the door caps are soft to the touch but openly grained. Consistent, not insistent--that's is all that's keeping the Impala from fully connecting with the elusive quality genome.



DESIGN


The 2014 Impala introduces a new aesthetic for Chevrolet's flagship sedan, but one that honors the cues that helped distinguish the classic nameplate for decades.

"Our design team was challenged to create a new classic, but that didn't mean relying on nostalgia," said John Cafaro, director of North America passenger car exterior design. "This is very much a contemporary car, with design elements, craftsmanship and attention to detail that complement its advanced technology and performance."

The Impala's long, low proportion has a wind-swept profile that suggests motion, while the range of 18-, 19- and 20-inch wheels is tailored to the body to provide that "just right" stance. At the front, low-profile projector-beam headlamps - or HID headlamps and LED daytime running lamps on LTZ - sweep around the corners and frame a wide grille, while a power dome hood conveys performance. The LTZ's LED daytime running lamps provide a contemporary visual statement, along with great visibility.

Sculpted coves in the body sides add to the Impala's design drama, with a sweeping signature cue in the rear fenders that acknowledges classic Impala designs. The "greenhouse" area is long, enhancing the sleek look of the car while maintaining excellent visibility. The deck lid appears short to complement the overall proportion, but opens to reveal a trunk with 18.8 cubic-feet (532 liters) of cargo space. Diagonal dual-signature taillamps and - on LTZ - chrome-outlined exhaust outlets complete the rear-end appearance.

Exterior colors include Black, Blue Ray, Blue Topaz Metallic, Champagne Silver Metallic, Crystal Red Tintcoat, Cyber Gray, Silver Ice Metallic, Silver Topaz Metallic, Summit White, Tin Roof Rusted and White Diamond Tricoat.

The 2014 Impala builds on Chevrolet's signature dual-cockpit interior with greater attention to detail and upscale features - seen in everything from the wraparound flow of the bold instrument panel into the door panels and the available ambient lighting, to the soft feel of the materials and the premium appearance of the seats' stitching. The instrument panel integrates a dynamic instrument cluster with a standard 4.2-inch color display with reconfigurable features for the driver information center. An eight-inch touch screen with concealed storage behind it is matched with the available Chevy MyLink system on LT and LTZ models

LS models feature cloth seats, while LT comes standard with cloth/vinyl seats. Sueded microfiber-trimmed seats are available on LT and LTZ models, which feature standard perforated leather seating.

Interior color choices include Brownstone, Dark Titanium, Jet Black and Mojave.



TECHNOLOGY






Impala is ingenuity put to work for the safety of you and your passengers, featuring newly available safety technologies that help give the driver not only "eyes in the back of their head" to aid in rear vision, but also help alert the driver to their sides and blind spots as well. Using radar sensors, Forward Collision Alert identifies vehicles ahead and alerts the driver to any potential crash risk while Rear Cross-Traffic Alert alerts the driver to crossing traffic from behind while the vehicle is in reverse.

Similar radar sensors keep an eye on blind spots to the side of the vehicle with the Side Blind Zone Alert, which illuminates small LED-lit symbols in the corresponding outside mirror when another vehicle is detected. Impala even keeps an eye on your driving with the available Lane Departure Warning. It gives you an audible alert while driving if you unintentionally drift out of your lane without using a turn signal.



COMFORT & QUALITY


In polite circles, the Impala would be called beefy. The Feds call it a full-size sedan. In truth, it's not a lot bigger than an Azera, a Passat, or an Avalon--but it packs a lot of room under its roofline, shaming the inefficient layout of the Ford Taurus, for one.

The Impala's overall length of 201.3 inches draws down to 111.7 inches between the wheels--compared to 106.3 inchess of wheelbase on, say, a three-row Kia Sorento crossover. It's 73 inches wide, too. Compared to the last Impala--now the fleet-only Limited--the 2014 version has about 3.5 inches more front-seat leg room and 2.2 inches more in the back seat.

Open the wide, tall doors, and the Impala V-6's nicely shaped seats aren't too deep a knee-bend away. At least five different seats are specified across the lineup, but that's mostly because of optional seat heating and ventilation--only the base versions are cloth. Leather-clad versions on the LTZ have a middle grade of hides covering them, better than the cloth/vinyl seats in look and just slightly, in feel, since lumbar adjustment comes with them standard. Head and leg room are more than enough for even 99th-percentile types; the Impala's one of the rare new cars where you can power the driver seat too low and too high.

The rear seats aren't quite as close to premium, but leg room is only an inch or two short of limousine status. The cushion lays almost flat, it's a bit short for the car's size--and even so, headroom isn't extraordinary. I made close contact with the headliner, and at six feet tall, I'm not the worst-case scenario for backseat use. Two adults will have enough space for a pre-teen between, though, and the seats can be fitted with bite-sized head rests shaped like old-school car bumpers. Score one for visibility.

Even with five passengers, filling the Impala's cargo bins will take some work. The trunk's 18.8 cubic feet, second only to the Taurus' 20-cubic-foot whopper. It's a little shallow, but the trunk floor is flat and extends deeply beneath the rear glass. The doors all have long bins with bottle holders; the center console can swallow a shoebox, a smartphone in either a rubberized tray or a bin hidden under a lid, and two drinks. If you're in an LT or an LTZ, there's a hidden chamber behind the MyLink LCD touchscreen, too--tap a button and the screen rises so you can stow goodies, then lock it out in a valet mode with a code you can enter and change.

Chevy has tuned the Impala's interior for quieter rolling ambience. Four-cylinder models will sport active noise cancellation, like Chevy's Equinox, and the plusher versions get thicker glass and more sound deadening. The impression of noise control is a good one.

It's in the area of fit and finish where the Impala can get a better sense of direction when it comes in for the inevitable mid-cycle refresh. The busy twin-cowl cockpit is covered, studded, paneled, and draped in so many different materials and textures, it's almost a parlor game to find and name them all. The seat-heater surround is a glitzy, flecked black plastic; the door caps are soft to the touch but openly grained. Consistent, not insistent--that's is all that's keeping the Impala from fully connecting with the elusive quality genome.



ENGINE




Of the three Impala powertrains available, we've had the most experience with the top-of-the-line 305-horsepower 3.6-liter V6. Its 264 lb-ft torque number won't bowl you over, but it felt strong during our 200 miles at the wheel, abetted by the 6-speed automatic transmission. The 2.5-liter 4-cylinder offers 196 horsepower and 186 lb-ft of torque. Arguably the most interesting engine choice is the 182-horsepower 2.4-liter Ecotec 4-cylinder that gets the benefit of eAssist. With a little help from its electric friend, the 2.4-liter engine will enable the Impala to deliver 35-mpg highway fuel economy.

► 2.5-liter inline-4
196 horsepower @ 6,300 rpm
186 lb-ft of torque @ 4,400 rpm
EPA city/highway fuel economy: 21/31 mpg

► 2.4-liter inline-4 with eAssist mild hybrid
182 horsepower @ 6,200 rpm
172 lb-ft of torque @ 4.900 rpm
EPA city/highway fuel economy: 25/35 mpg

► 3.6-liter V6
305 horsepower @ 6,800 rpm
264 lb-ft of torque @ 5,300 rpm
EPA city/highway fuel economy: 19/29 mpg



PERFORMANCE


► In just 6.8 seconds :

At the heart of Impala lies the acclaimed 3.6L V6 engine boasting 305 horsepower and 0-60 mph in just 6.8 seconds. Direct Injection injects fuel closer to the combustion chamber for an efficient, powerful “burn.” At partial or full throttle, you’ll feel the powerful response. Variable Valve Timing consistently boosts power by providing near-peak torque over a wider rpm range. The available engine’s refined power and finely tuned precision contribute to the confident and strong ride Impala is known for, while preserving impressive efficiencies such as an EPA-estimated 29 MPG highway.

► Agile ride and handling :

The stiff body structure and grounded stance allowed engineers to tune ride and handling precisely for an impressive “connected to the road” experience. The premium electric rack-and-pinion steering system delivers crisp, responsive handling and excellent on-center feel. A tight steering radius combined with an available variable-effort feature, which increases the level of power assistance during low-speed maneuvers, offers the driver impressive command over city streets and sharp turns. In the end it creates a smooth, effortless ride

► Connected to the road :

The grounded stance exudes an air of confidence, while its refined exterior design and profile leave a lasting impression whether in motion or standing still. But this longer wheelbase and sculpted, stiff body structure are at the center of a more commanding driving experience. The 2014 Impala is the car for the assured driver ready to enjoy each turn, every hill and whatever the road may bring.



DRIVETRAIN


For a large family sedan, the 2014 Impala is effortless to drive. Strong acceleration gives the Impala V6 the fortitude required to negotiate city traffic, merge onto freeways with the flow of traffic, and climb mountain grades all while returning better than 20 mpg, on average.

The new Impala's electric steering offers pleasing heft regardless of vehicle speed, and crisp response when bending the Impala into a curve or while turning into a parking space. Given that it's the same system as found in the Camaro, recalibrated for the full-size Chevy sedan, perhaps this comes as no surprise. Suspension tuning provides a deft blend of ride smoothness and handling prowess, and while the Impala is not a sport sedan, it can cover ground at a rapid pace on twisty roads.

Chevrolet installs its new Duralife brake rotors on the 2014 Impala, a patented piece of engineering designed to double the life of the rotors to 80,000 miles while simultaneously eliminating rust and reducing brake shudder as the car ages. We found the Impala's brake pedal responsive, displaying natural progression through the range of motion, which helps to fine tune the amount of pressure fed to the brakes.

Chevrolet could improve the new Impala with regard to the 6-speed automatic transmission. We found that it stumbled on occasion, especially when driving in the mountains. A manual shift button is provided at the top of the gear selector, but it is unsatisfying to use, despite the fact that it matches engine revs when downshifting.

Impala LTZ models equipped with the optional 20-inch aluminum wheels sure look terrific, but there is a penalty to be paid in terms of ride quality and interior noise. So equipped, more of the road texture is delivered to the cabin, sometimes rudely, as in the case of traveling over a pothole. The 20-inch tires also create more road noise.



SAFETY


Safety was a top priority when designing the all-new Impala. And after undergoing stringent testing by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), the 2014 Impala received a 5-Star Overall Vehicle Score for Safety, NHTSA’s highest possible rating.
In addition to the 5-Star NHTSA Overall Vehicle Score, Impala offers some of the most innovative and ingenious advances in safety technology from standard StabiliTrak to available Crash Imminent Braking.

The Advanced Safety Package, available on LT and standard on LTZ, features additional available technologies such as Forward Collision Alert, which scans for vehicles ahead and alerts the driver to potential crash risks. Also available on LTZ: opt for additional safety features including Full-Speed-Range Adaptive Cruise Control and enhanced Forward Collision Alert with Crash Imminent Braking, which utilizes radar in the front grille to sense traffic ahead. Adaptive Cruise Control adjusts or maintains vehicle speed accordingly when set to “maintain follow distance”. The enhanced Forward Collision Alert with Crash Imminent Braking can automatically apply the brakes to help avoid a front-end collision or reduce impact speed.



FUEL ECONOMY


Gas mileage won't be the first reason the Impala ends up on anyone's shopping list, and the V-6 versions are set to earn EPA ratings a few miles per gallon lower than some other big four-doors.

The EPA has published the Impala's gas-mileage ratings, with the base vehicle coming in at 25 mpg (21 mpg city, 31 mpg highway) and the more powerful V-6 at 21 mpg combined (18 mpg city, 28 mpg highway).

The combined 21-mpg rating for the V-6 falls below the Toyota Avalon's 25 mpg, the V-6 Taurus' 23 mpg combined, and the 23-mpg figure posted by the Hyundai Azera and the Dodge Charger with its new eight-speed automatic. In our first-drive test loop set up by Chevy, the V-6 Impala's indicated economy checked in at 20.3 mpg, tallied after lots of canyon runs and a few stretches of 75-mph interstate.

Four-cylinder versions brighten the picture. We logged 25.1 mpg--right on the nose--for the base 2.5-liter four-cylinder Impala, albeit over a short 20-minute drive covering about 12 miles.

At the top of the fuel-economy list is the Impala Eco, fitted with GM's mild-hybrid eAssist system. The addition of special aero add-ons--dams, spats, and active grille shutters that smooth the nose for better efficiency--lets the Impala Eco equal the 29-mpg combined figure of the Buick Lacrosse that uses the same system. That's better than the 26 mpg of the turbocharged EcoBoost Ford Taurus--but well off the 40-mpg mark set by the Toyota Avalon Hybrid.



VIDEO ( 2014 CHEVROLET IMPALA )

Video by : Testdrivenow




By : Automotive News & Super Modified Sports Cars

Posted by : Shahen Tharammal



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